Yesterday, Trump lackey and regime mouthpiece, Nikki Haley walked out of the United Nations Security Council meeting as the Palestinian envoy began speaking. In true regime form that mimicked North Korea’s walkout on Donald Trump last September, Haley’s impudent demonstration and rebuke of the Palestinian Authority further highlights the Trump regime’s growing intolerance and likeness to an autocratic dictatorship.

Just days after the pomp and circumstance celebrating the opening of a new U.S. embassy in Jerusalem, tensions on the Gaza Strip remain high. Israeli snipers and military have murdered more than 50 civilians since Political Playtime Barbie, Ivanka Trump, led the opening ceremonies on Monday. Moving the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem was a symbolic move that experts warned would enrage long-standing conflicts in the Middle East.

In typical fashion, Trump heralded the move — to a building named after him no less — as one of his greatest accomplishments to date without regard for the loss of life or risks that accompanied the move. Haley, in her statement to the U.N. before walking out on Wednesday, condemned the PA and Hamas as the source of violence. Her statements strike not only at the spirit of the United Nations and its mission to peaceful resolution, but to the very soul of America’s democratic ideals.

In truth, the message that Haley and the Trump regime are sending to the world, is that protest is neither acceptable, nor tolerated. How long will it be in the United States before a militarized police, inspired by Trump’s attacks on the First Amendment and freedoms of the press and people, begin opening fire on domestic protesters the way Israelis did Monday? The U.S. is precariously close, under Trump, to a repeat of the 1970 Kent State protest murders during Richard Nixon’s presidency.

Only days before the Kent State murders, President Nixon criticized protesters as “bums” and called American soldiers, “the greatest.” In language that eerily foreshadows the rise (and eventual fall) of Trumpism, Nixon had a way of avoiding responsibility, casting blame, name calling, and speaking in superlatives — many of the same attributes exhibited by the dictatorial Trump. Both men represent an unyielding egotism and thirst for unfettered power in the face of constitutional governance and temperance.

Fifty years have passed since the election and debacle of Richard Nixon, but already America finds itself facing the greatest constitutional crisis of the modern era. Any lessons learned during the Nixon administration have been lost to time and reality television — giving a rogue unqualified old man the opportunity to exercise a personal agenda of hatred, incompetence, and revenge. Trump continues to march on a path of self-gratifying accomplishments irresponsive to the impact or his personal culpability.

While Israeli soldiers gunned down innocent men, women, and children on Monday, the Trump regime has cast further insult and injury on the Palestinian people by denying any responsibility — though the embassy move can be construed as a direct instigator. Before walking out of the Security Council chambers yesterday, Haley offered a stern rebuke against Hamas and the PA, suggesting that the protests were merely a pretext to attack the Israeli border.

Denying culpability is a trademark of not only Trump, but of dictatorial regimes the world over. There is always an excuse or another to blame, because a key component of authoritarian rule is that the supreme leader is above the laws of the state. Haley confirmed this yesterday with both her statement and her walkout. Trump is inching ever closer to an assumed position of isolation from legal responsibility for any act.

Less than two months ago when a man died in Trump’s building in New York City — a building that Trump has refused to bring up to current fire codes — Trump tweeted about how well built the structure was. He offered no condolences or acknowledgement of the tragic death of 67-year-old Todd Brassner. Trump’s callousness and disregard for basic social norms and legal ethics lay the groundwork for every next step in the escalating power grab in Washington, D.C.

The disgusting irony that exists between this week’s Israeli murders and Trump is that thousands of men and women are imprisoned in the United States on the premises of accomplice liability. To be convicted of homicide, murder, or manslaughter in most U.S. courts of law, a defendant need never have spilled blood. Pursuant to many accomplice culpability statutes, a person may be guilty of a crime they did not commit, provided he helped or influenced the perpetrator with the required mens rea.

Donald Trump knew that the action of moving the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem would cause widespread discord in the Middle East — and if he did not, then he has no business making such decisions in the first place. None-the-less, he ordered, sanctioned, and publicized the event. He acted with deliberate indifference for the ensuing violence that erupted on Monday. He bears, at least in the court of worldwide public opinion, the same guilt as the Israeli soldiers that pulled their triggers.

In the arena of global politics, dictators from Asia, Africa, South America, or any number of places around the world, typically gain a certain level of infamy for crimes against humanity. Donald Trump is a name new to the realm of despots and tyrants, but he is making an early impression. As the global response to the Israeli murdering escalates, and the world’s nations protest both Israel and Donald Trump, it will soon be Nikki Haley who is speaking to an empty chamber at the U.N.

 

Featured Image: Ibraheem Abu Mustafa/Reuters via CNS.

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